Behind The Scenes

Tag Archives: Civil War

Quilting: Not Just For Women

Quilting, and many other domestic crafts, has long been considered the realm of women (and sometimes was dismissed because of that). But quilting is a serious art, and it’s not just for women. Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War, now on view at the New-York Historical Society, features this quilt made [...]

When New York Wanted To Secede

Most people think of New York as the center of all that is liberal and progressive in America, with strong, Dutch-instilled values of tolerance permeating the culture. However, New York is also a place of business, and before the Civil War that meant it dealt heavily with the business of slavery. In December 1860, South [...]

It’s Halloween! Let’s Look At Some Spooky Historical Death Masks

Happy Halloween! Aside from the dressing up and eating candy until we’re sick, Halloween is traditionally a time reserved for honoring the dead. And what better way to do that than by looking at some death masks? A death mask is a typically plaster or wax cast made of a person’s face after they’ve died. [...]

Wounded Scout: Rogers Takes On The Gravity Of The Civil War

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” Watch Kim Orcutt and Harold Holzer tour the exhibition on YouTube.  Over the night of February 9/10, 1864, more than one hundred Union [...]

Rogers and Rockwell

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” Watch Kim Orcutt and Harold Holzer tour the exhibition on YouTube.  The sculptor John Rogers is often compared to Norman Rockwell, and [...]

John Rogers: An Abolitionist Alone at Christmas

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” John Rogers couldn’t make it home to Roxbury, Massachusetts for Christmas in 1859. He had just settled in New York and was trying [...]

Bronze or Plaster? The Artistic Choices of John Rogers

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” Bronze or plaster? When you’re in the galleries of John Rogers: American Stories, you’ll see that about half of the sculptures are bronze [...]

Happy Birthday John Rogers!

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” Happy Birthday John Rogers! The sculptor was born on October 30, 1829 and he is a favorite at the New- York [...]

Abraham Lincoln: The Coolest President?

In case you hadn’t heard, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter has made its way to the big screen. Starring Benjamin Walker, it traces the President as he discovers that vampires are planning to take over the country, and as he makes it his mission to eliminate the threat. Recently, author, screenwriter, and producer Seth Grahame-Smith sat [...]

Memorial Day: The Whole World is Watching

When Memorial Day was first celebrated, America was learning to be America again. Over 600,000 soldiers had fallen over four years, fighting for the Union and the Confederacy, and the wounds had not yet healed. David Blight, author of Race and Reunion, wrote about the early memorials just after the Civil War in the New York [...]