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Lincoln and the Jews: An Interview with Dr. Jonathan Sarna
April 3, 2015

Did you know that more than twice as many books have been written about Abraham Lincoln than weeks have passed since his death almost 150 years ago? With Passover beginning at sundown, we’re honoring Lincoln’s legacy by exploring an untold aspect of his personal life and political career: his friendships with Jews. During his tenure…

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Guest Blogger Harold Holzer on Lincoln and the Jews
March 13, 2015

To celebrate the upcoming opening of our groundbreaking exhibition, Lincoln and the Jews on March 20, Harold Holzer, the Roger Hertog Fellow at the New-York Historical Society and Chief Historian to the exhibition, has signed on as this week’s guest blogger. In his post, he highlights the show and the exciting history it illuminates. So…

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Quilting: Not Just For Women
April 10, 2014

Quilting, and many other domestic crafts, has long been considered the realm of women (and sometimes was dismissed because of that). But quilting is a serious art, and it’s not just for women. Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War, now on view at the New-York Historical Society, features this quilt made…

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When New York Wanted To Secede
January 9, 2014

Most people think of New York as the center of all that is liberal and progressive in America, with strong, Dutch-instilled values of tolerance permeating the culture. However, New York is also a place of business, and before the Civil War that meant it dealt heavily with the business of slavery. In December 1860, South…

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It’s Halloween! Let’s Look At Some Spooky Historical Death Masks
October 31, 2013

Happy Halloween! Aside from the dressing up and eating candy until we’re sick, Halloween is traditionally a time reserved for honoring the dead. And what better way to do that than by looking at some death masks? A death mask is a typically plaster or wax cast made of a person’s face after they’ve died….

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Wounded Scout: Rogers Takes On The Gravity Of The Civil War
February 7, 2013

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” Watch Kim Orcutt and Harold Holzer tour the exhibition on YouTube.  Over the night of February 9/10, 1864, more than one hundred Union…

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Rogers and Rockwell
January 17, 2013

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” Watch Kim Orcutt and Harold Holzer tour the exhibition on YouTube.  The sculptor John Rogers is often compared to Norman Rockwell, and…

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John Rogers: An Abolitionist Alone at Christmas
December 13, 2012

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” John Rogers couldn’t make it home to Roxbury, Massachusetts, for Christmas in 1859. He had just settled in New York and was trying…

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Rogers Groups, the Perfect Christmas Gift
November 28, 2012

In honor of our upcoming exhibition, John Rogers: American Stories, curator Kim Orcutt will be writing a series of posts about his life, his work, and how he earned the nickname “The People’s Sculptor.” If you were shopping for a Christmas present 150 years ago, you might have thought about a Rogers Group. The plaster sculptures on…

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